Search This Blog

Loading...

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Two tales of gastric bypass surgery

This story appeared today from The Canadian Press:

Mom's obesity surgery may help her children

It reports on a study that followed kids' risk factors for obesity. Children who were born to an obese mother before she had weight-loss surgery were heavier, and had higher risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, than children born to that same mother after surgery. Researchers say it was because obesity causes differences in the activity of certain genes. Not that obesity affects the genes themselves, but how the genes express themselves.

The story is fine by itself. Rather well written, in fact. (Bonus points for great quotability go to co-author Dr. John Kral, who said fetuses are "differently marinated" depending on the weight of the mother.) And everything would be hunky dory were it not for this item, which was covered by Reuters two months earlier:

After weight-loss surgery, new gut bacteria keep obesity away

This one explains exactly how gastric bypass surgery helps people slim down. Researchers found that it may not have to do with going under the knife, but rather, with how the surgery changes the patient's gut bacteria. (The study was done on mice, and as a result, controlled for nearly everything; control group mice were even given a "sham" surgery.) The study raised an important question: might it be possible to skip surgery, and achieve the same effect by altering gut bugs through diet or another means?

These stories were two separate entities, presented weeks apart. But taken together, here's what I gather:

1) A mother's gastric bypass surgery helps change a baby's gene expression and makes him or her healthier for life

2) Gastric bypass surgery might not be necessary because what matters is the change in bacteria that occurs after the surgery

So if you were a woman of a high body weight who planned to become pregnant, wouldn't you want someone to have raised the connection between these two studies? Maybe you read the news today and have become convinced that gastric bypass surgery is the best way forward, even with the risks it presents. And your appointment to discuss it with your doctor is tomorrow.

But maybe you could have had other options.

Source:  http://www.citelighter.com/card/Gastric-Bypass/1352


The fact that no one communicated the connection between these studies is a huge oversight. I'd even argue that it is bad for scientific progress. Science is about converging upon the truth with different studies conducted under different circumstances. So why are we still presenting science studies without context or analysis, as individually-wrapped peppermint candies?

Let's give everyone the benefit of the doubt in this case and say it's because the person assigned to cover the study wasn't aware of any other relevant studies. Sure, the scientists this person interviewed are supposed to have told him or her about the context. But it's not actually a scientist's job to be aware of the news coming out of other labs at any given moment. It's the journalist's job to be informed in real time.

This is a strong argument for assigning health and science stories to those who make it their full-time mission to keep abreast of a certain area of health and science. That is to say, specialist journalists. (Luckily there are several great people, including Rob Steiner at U of T, who are working to create a new generation of specialist journos that will provide content to newsrooms that are operating on a skeleton staff of generalists.)

These two studies are just one example of something I notice all the time. Other specialists could probably cite examples from their own fields. The point is, news is set up for these obvious failures to connect the dots. But we need to work toward changing that. It's only fair to that woman - a future mother - signing the surgery release form at this very moment.

19 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. At some point down the road, you will most likely need a revision procedure to replace old implants.
    Know more
    REVISION SURGERY

    ReplyDelete
  3. A Mini-Gastric Bypass surgery is now more preferred over the traditional surgery from helping you to select the right surgeons.
    MINI BYPASS

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've recently just undergone the procedure myself and I've experience rapid weight loss in a very short amount of time. While it is true that I can not eat certain foods anymore, I am more than fine with adjusting what I eat to accommodate my new lifestyle.
    I have also started eating mostly all organic foods which is supposed to help your body with the healing process. Has anyone tried an all organic diet after surgery? Over-all the best piece of advice I can give is to stick to your gastric sleeve diet and watch the weight just melt off of you.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Blog is very nice found some good stuff and good information here! I enjoyed reading this post. My doctor suggested consuming Pro Biotic diet. please suggest me some good diet.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for sharing this Great post.....The mini gastric bypass is a minimally invasive procedure that forms the stomach into a long narrow tube.
    MINI BYPASS

    ReplyDelete
  7. There are so many risks as well as rewards that come along with gastric bypass surgery. Articles like this make me think does the risk out weight the reward? Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Very informative blog! I'm pleased to learn two tales of gastric bypass surgery proper study. Appreciation for taking time to write such handy article!!
    bypass surgery

    ReplyDelete
  10. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is a great inspiring article. I am pretty much pleased with your good work. You put really very helpful information.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This one explains exactly how gastric bypass surgery helps people slim down. http://www.fastweightloss.com/programs/

    ReplyDelete
  13. Useful information shared..I am very happy to read this article. Thanks for giving us nice info. Fantastic walk-through. I appreciate this post.
    Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I am very much pleased with the contents you have mentioned. I wanted to thank you for this great article. I enjoyed every little bit part of it and I will be waiting for the new updates.for more details something like visit stomach sleeve surgery mexico get more informations.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Gastric bypass surgery should be performed with the consent and recommendation of your doctor. This might get out of hand if advertised more frequently. Surgery such ash this should only be done under health risks and as a last resort if diet or other natural detoxification process won't work. What has been done to your body in surgery can never be undone. So we must not make such risky choices for the sake of vanity and comfort. I know we can always do what we set our minds into.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi, This is a good post, indeed a great job. You must have done good research for the work.

    Choosing the best Gastric bypass surgery in Mexico

    ReplyDelete
  18. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I would like to thank for creating this Great post.....The small stomach avoid is a non-invasive process that types the stomach into a long filter pipe.

    ReplyDelete